How to make your home cat-friendly.

Bob on Guard

So you’ve bought or rescued a cat, a cuddly companion that you’ve invited to share your home?

 

Make it part of your family and be sure its as comfortable as possible by following these simple steps.

 

Miss Mew

 

Give them some room.

 

Cats are territorial creatures. They like to own space and claim it as theirs.

It’s important to integrate your cat into your home. Dedicate space or an entire room for them and create an area where they feel safe and secure. Their space is a place of comfort for them, and a way to make them feel welcome in an unfamiliar environment.

A cat is a companion, so be prepared to make room for them and enjoy their company.

 

Mew Hiding from Oliver

 

Keep your house clean.

 

Distribute litter boxes in suitable spots around your house and train your cat to use them. Litter trays contain waste and prevent foul odors permeating the house. It makes sense to put one in their ‘zone’ where they feel comfortable. You might also consider putting one near the door, or a window they regularly use to exit and re-enter your property.

It’s important to clean them out regularly to maintain house hygiene.

 

Stu, Mew and Oliver.

 

Provide stimulating toys.

 

Cats are intelligent animals.

They like to be entertained and stimulated.

They develop positive, loving behaviors when treated right.

Providing stimulants minimizes destructive or unsociable traits from forming. Also, introducing toys gives you the opportunity to interact and bond with your cat too. Set aside time each day to play with them and teach them to interact with you.

 

How to make your home cat friendly.

Photograph.

 

Set them free.

 

Cats are independent and brave.

They like to wander, explore, mark their territory and tend to walk the same route each time.

Give your cat their independence by installing a cat flap. This is a good way to enable your cat to come and go as they please. Cat flaps are especially good in cold weather when your cat will want to curl up indoors.

 

Pet-proof your floors.

 

Cats will bring in all manner of nasties from outside. We’ve experience birds, rats, mice, moles, and even snakes. In one incident, while still a kitten, Mew brought home a baby bunny – still alive. This was one present that couldn’t be called nasty, and one the kids dearly wanted to keep. However, Mark took them to the park to release the bunny – hopefully to find it’s family.

Dirty paws will quickly soil clean carpets. A mouse or bird will be unceremoniously deposited on your favorite rug, and sometimes not in very good or clean condition!

Consider installing a hardwood floor. Timber floors, for example, are far easier to clean than wool carpets. Be mindful not to polish them too rigorously though. Otherwise, you’ll turn your floor into a skating rink for your cat! Mop up spills quickly to prevent your cat from running and skidding across the surface.

 

Protect your furniture.

 

Introduce scratching posts around your home. Scratching posts are specifically designed for the benefit of cats – and for homeowners’ too. Scratching posts provide an alternative to and prevent your cat from using your furniture to sharpen its claws. It is a worthwhile investment in the long run.

They come in all manner of designs, from the traditional perpendicular design to elaborate cat trees and towers. Find the design to suit your cat and your space.

 

Balls of wool at the ready…

Your furry friend is here to stay!